Staircase Construction in 2-pt Perspective

StairCase

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This video was shot during class by Jannat Saxena. We will try to reshoot it with studio lighting as soon as time permits, but in the meantime, I hope this helps, and thank Jannat next time you see her!

This method of staircase calculation and construction is difficult to find in books, but is a very good system for helping us to quickly construct believable and accurate staircases between different floor levels. Some methods work very well for just a few steps and/or so long as we build the geometry sufficient above or below the horizon line, where the geometry can be mapped. However, believable staircases often start below our eye level, on the floor, and then rise up above our horizon line, or drop off, down to the floor below. The solution to this problem, and the key in this system is to use sloped vanishing points as control lines for both the nose of the steps as well as the inside corner where riser and tread meet. These control lines work in concert with the division system for dividing up your floor-to-floor distances into an even and believable number of steps. Depending on whether the next floor level is 10, 11, or 12 feet, etc. above your ground level, then you’ll need anywhere from 17 to 21 stairs. As well, you may want a landing and a change of direction to your stairs; this system will help ensure they are believable.

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2-Point Pull-Down (aka Projection) Perspective for Spaces. Part 2. Construction

2-Point Pull-Down Method for Spaces Part 2-3

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2-Point Pull-Down (aka Projection) Perspective for Spaces. Part 1. Basic Setup

2-Point Pull-Down System for Spaces (Basic Setup)

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Vertical Reflections

Objects that appear in vertical plane mirrors or chrome (chrome-like surfaces) appear “in” the mirror the same distance away from the mirror’s edge as the object is from that same edge or plane. Therefore, the reflection appears smaller as it’s moving away from the viewer toward the horizon line. To calculate it accurately, the student needs to utilize a bit of bisection and triangulation geometry applied using the rules of perspective.

Vertical Reflections

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2-Point Pull-Down Construction System (aka Projection Method) for Objects

This 2-pt perspective using the “pull-down” construction method is used for creating objects. A separate video covers application of this same system for constructing spaces, useful in interior design, architecture and exhibition design.

2-Point Pull-Down System for Objects

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